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Radio Voice Procedures
Forum » Training Area » Standard Operating Procedures
Joined: 13th May 2013
Rank: Management
Likes 621
13th Mar

To keep comms at a working level and not to jam up radio channels we need to be disciplined in what we say and hear.
There are two basic considerations when talking on the air.

1. WHAT TO SAY (Voice procedure)
2. HOW TO SAY IT (Voice Technique)


WHAT IS VOICE PROCEDURE?
Voice procedure is a set of rules designed to provide SECURITY, ACCURACY and DISCIPLINE when speaking on the radio, acronym - SAD

SECURITY
Think before you speak.
Use correct procedure
Be brief

ACCURACY
The necessity for clear speech, on the two-way radio, cannot be overemphasised. Therefore the RSVP system should be used to enhance better voice procedure and technique.
R RHYTHM Adequate pauses.
S SPEED Slower than usual conversation.
V VOLUME Speak directly into the microphone.
P PITCH The voice should be pitched at a higher level than for normal
conversation.

DISCIPLINE
Radio discipline is the responsibility of everyone and should adhere to the following:
Listen before you speak.
Use correct voice procedure.
Answer all calls promptly.
Keep the airways free of unnecessary talk.
Be brief and to the point.

PROWORDS
Prowords are used to indicate a specific meaning that replaces abbreviated sentences or phrases. They are standard, easily pronounced words, which have been assigned special meanings and can speed up message handling on radio networks reducing the chance of an error being introduced into a message.

WORD/ PHRASE MEANING

AFFIRMATIVE used when a question is asked and the reply is YES
BREAK, BREAK Interruption of a transmission
CONTACT Used to declare ‘contact’ has been made with the enemy. ALL OTHER TRAFFIC NOT RELEVANT TO THE CONTACT SHOULD CEASE
DISREGARD The transmission has been made in error- ignore
FIGURES Numbers to follow
HELLO Used as opening word in a call to another station (alert all listeners a message is about to be sent)
GRIDS Used when sending grid references. Used instead of FIGURES so that the numbers are known to be positional data
GO AHEAD I am ready to receive your messages
I SPELL Next word will be spelt out phonetically
I SAY AGAIN I’m repeating my last message
NEGATIVE used when a question is asked and the reply is NO
OUT end of transmission, no answer is required or expected
OVER Invitation to transmit, a response is expected or needed
ROGER Message received and understood
ROGER SO FAR Confirm parts of long messages
SAY AGAIN Repeat your last transmission
SITREP Situational report
WAIT OVER Wait a short period and I will get back to you
WAIT OUT Wait a longer period than ‘wait over’ I will get back to you ASAP
WRONG Means an error has been made will repeat from last correctly transmitted word
(More will be added as I remember them)

Phonetic Alphabet
When someone has difficulty understanding a word or name, the best way to get it across is to spell it.
These words are spelt phonetically to avoid confusion.
Example- ETA should be spoken as ‘Echo Tango Alpha’
A. ALPHA
B. BRAVO
C. CHARLIE
D. DELTA
E. ECHO
F. FOXTROT
G. GOLF
H. HOTEL
I. INDIA
J. JULIET
K. KILO
L. LIMA
M. MIKE
N. NOVEMBER
O. OSCAR
P. PAPA
Q. QUEBEC
R. ROMEO
S. SIERRA
T. TANGO
U. UNIFORM
V. VICTOR
W. WHISKEY
X. X-RAY
Y. YANKEE
Z. ZULU

SIGNAL REPORTING
When a radio check is made the receiving station needs to inform the transmitting station how well the transmission is being heard. To do this a simple scale is used.
READABILITY
1- unreadable
2- bearly readable some words now and the
3- readable with difficulty
4- readable with minimal difficulty
5- perfectly readable (loud and clear)
SIGNAL STRENGTH
1- fading signal
2- very weak signal
3- weak signal
4- good signal
5- Loud signal

INITIATING A RADIO CHECK
Whenever you're using a radio for the first time or in doubt of the performance of the radio, the simplest way to check is to use a RADIO CHECK. The message should consist of
1. Proword ‘HELLO’
2. The callsign of who your contacting
3. The words ‘THIS IS’
4. Your callsign
5. ‘RADIO CHECK’
6. Proword ‘OVER’

Example
HELLO, 1-0 ALPHA, THIS IS 1-1 CHARLIE, RADIO CHECK, OVER
1-1 CHARLIE, THIS IS 1-0 ALPHA, YOU ARE 5 BY 5, OVER
1-0 ALPHA, THIS IS 1-1 CHARLIE, ROGER, OUT

USEFUL ACRONYMS
C.A.R.O.T
CONCISE keep it short
ACCURATE be sure to pass all information correctly
RELEVANCE be sure only to pass information required by the station you are talking with. Do not waffle or pass irrelevant information
OBJECTIVE keep in mind what the intention and purpose of the message is
TIMELY pass the message when it is needed

C.R.A.P.S.H.O.O.T
COMPOSE your message in your head or if time permits write in down
RELAX take a deep breath and listen to the channel, so your not in a panic and not trying to speak over someone else
ACTIVATE the push to talk button
PAUSE for a second so that the first few words of your message are not cut off
SPEAK slowly and clearly with pauses and do not shout so that you can easily be understood
HAIL the call sign using the ProwordS HELLO, CALL SIGN then identify yourself the ProwordS THIS IS, CALL SIGN
OVER: send your message with the Proword OVER at the end of your transmission, OVER means that you expect or need a reply. It’s sometimes referred to as an invitation to reply
OUT: OUT is used to formally finish a communication session. Use OUT when a reply is not needed, expected or wanted
TRAFFIC: once finished, keep listening for incoming Traffic.
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